The fragility of existence

There is a very thin layer, a fragile membrane between peace and calamity, between life and death. 

It has no respect for place or persons.

I have experienced rupture a few times and I have been close to it countless times. 

If you have not experienced it or have not been close, you do not live on this planet.

The fragility of existence calls for dependence on God. 

In the twinkling of an eye, peace can become calamity.

I have survived rupture against all odds by depending wholly on the Truth.

I have avoided rupture against all odds by depending only on the Truth.

Hosts of wickedness encamp against me and death compasses me about, yet I am not swallowed up, I flourish.

Attributing my life to chance would be intellectual dishonesty.

I cannot but testify that my Redeemer lives, regardless of what you think or how politically incorrect I sound.

My continued existence, my thriving despite the fragility of existence prove to me He is “the way, the truth and the life.”

5 thoughts on “The fragility of existence

  1. “. . . so that, as sin reigned in death, grace also might reign through righteousness leading to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.” Romans 5:21
    In Romans 5:12-21, Paul “is not saying merely that we have life for a time, after which life ends in death; nor is he aiming to explain the fact of such death. . . . What he is saying is rather that all that we call life . . . lies under the dominion of death. . . . Death rules supreme in this world. . . .” But since the resurrection of Christ “the new aeon has become actual fact in our world. Christ stands at the frontier between the two ages, outdating the old and blazing the way for the new. . . . In the new aeon, which burst upon man with the resurrection of Christ, life has come to dominion still more mightily.”
    Anders Nygren, Commentary on Romans, pages 22-23.
    This life we live is not life. This life is a living death. This whole world is ruins brilliantly disguised as elegance. Christ alone is life. Christ has come, bringing his life into the wreckage called us. He has opened up, even in these ruins, the frontier of a new world where grace reigns. He is not on a mission to help us improve our lives here. He is on a mission to create a new universe, where grace reigns in life. He is that massive, that majestic, that decisive, that critical and towering and triumphant.
    We don’t “apply this to our lives.” It’s too big for that. But we worship him. And we boast in the hope of living forever with him in his new death-free world of grace.
    “Ray Ortlund”

    • Sir, this is so rich I consider myself blessed to receive it on this blog. “Christ stands at the frontier between the two ages, out dating the old and blazing the way for the new…

      “This whole world is ruins brilliantly disguised as elegance.” Hmmmm. That statement summarizes several of my blog posts including, “What on earth is life.”

      May we live the life Christ procured for us, that shows the life we call life to be the death that it is.

      Thank you for these profundities.

      I checked out Ray Ortlund and encountered depth. Thank you.

  2. “Hosts of wickedness encamp against me and death compasses me about, yet I am not swallowed up, I flourish.

    Attributing my life to chance would be intellectual dishonesty.

    I cannot but testify that my Redeemer lives, regardless of what you think or how politically incorrect I sound.”
    I loved that in between. Reminded me of a Psalm of David, don’t know which exactly.
    In our stillness, when all is quiet and all that is falling and crumbling has landed on the ground, you know, even before the chaos starts like in the mornings when the it’s only the annoying happy bird songs we can ear, we all know He is. No matter the religion or where we come from. :)

  3. Pingback: Resources for Romans 5:12 - 21

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